Science Behind the News: Quantum Computing

submitted by: nsf

Imagine if engineers could build a computer to be millions of times faster than anything that exists today, yet so small it’s microscopic. John Preskill, a theoretical physicist at the California Institute of Technology, explains the science behind quantum computing, the next great frontier in computer science. "Science Behind the News" is produced in partnership with NBC Learn.

Provided by the National Science Foundation & NBC Learn

Science Behind the News: Predictive Policing

submitted by: nsf

"The Los Angeles Police Department is using a new tactic in their fight against crime called “predictive policing.” It's a computer program that was originally developed by a team at UCLA, including mathematician Andrea Bertozzi and anthropologist Jeff Brantingham. “Science Behind the News” is produced in partnership with NBC Learn.

Provided by the National Science Foundation & NBC Learn

Science Behind the News: Crowdsourcing

submitted by: nsf

When humans and computers work together, they can find solutions to many different types of problems. Luis von Ahn, a computer science professor at Carnegie Mellon University, explains the science behind crowdsourcing and how the concept is helping solve such diverse problems as digitizing books online and translating the web to foreign languages. "Science Behind the News" is produced in partnership with NBC Learn.

Provided by the National Science Foundation & NBC Learn

Science Nation - DigiMorph

submitted by: nsf
Cutting edge research without having to cut up anything! For hundreds of years, scientists who wanted to examine a rare fossil might have had to travel halfway around the world. And that is not the only challenge when viewing a small, unique or priceless specimen. Now a new range of tools provides a chance for researchers anywhere in the world to see a one-of-a-kind specimen, with no fear of damaging it. For more Science Nation visit:...

Science Nation - Virtual Self

submitted by: nsf

An avatar is a virtual representation of ourselves in the digital world, but it can also affect our real-world self. Watch how in this episode of Science Nation.

For more Science Nation visit: http://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/science_nation/index.jsp

Science Nation - Music and Creativity

submitted by: nsf
Georgia Tech's Parag Chordia believes music is a universal part of human culture, and his research shows music education can inspire greater interest in math, physics, and computer science. Chordia heads Georgia Tech's "Music Intelligence Group." With support from the National Science foundation, his goals are to program computers to understand music the way humans do naturally - anticipating what is coming next. He's also studying changes in the brains of professional musicians as they play...

CHALK TALK: BINARY

submitted by: nsf

A binary system of numbers is one that is composed only of ones and zeros. It was the system of choice for people who developed early computers--they needed a reliable way to get information across electrical circuits, and a way that was easy for the systems to understand.

Kaleidoscope Project

submitted by: Doorbell Productions

A proposal for an interactive process that integrates myth and science regarding water-culture awareness. If science and myth are reconciled, we believe that synthesis can occur within communities in ways that enable collaboration, trust building, and local water policy change, especially where common pool resources are a concern.
Kaleidoscope Authors: John Klock, Ana Lu Fonseca, Denise Elston, Sarah Sheldrick, and Brock Tabor

Wayne Pheiffer presents "Performance Characterization of Codes on Different Machines"

submitted by: SDSC

Performance Characterization of Codes on Different Machines