SCIENCE OF SPEED: FIRESUITS

submitted by: nsf

"Frightening" is how Jeff Gordon describes fire, even though he knows he's protected head to toe (and right down to his underwear) by fire-resistant Nomex fabric. Firesuits and the associated gear don't just protect drivers from fire, though--they decrease the rate of heat transfer, giving the driver a little more time to move somewhere cooler.

SCIENCE OF SPEED: BALANCE

submitted by: nsf

A racecar driver is like Goldilocks: The car always seems to be too loose or too tight. Getting the right balance is hard because the weight of the fuel changes and the tires wear during each green-flag run. Understanding the science is how crew chiefs make the car “just right”.

SCIENCE OF SPEED: SOUND

submitted by: nsf

"Loud is fast" Brian Vickers tells us, and speed is one reason racecars don't have mufflers. Experiencing a NASCAR race means feeling the roar of the engines as well as hearing them. It's all good--as long as you’ve got your ear protection.

SCIENCE OF SPEED: GRIP

submitted by: nsf

There's one thing every driver always want more of: Grip. Grip is the frictional force that holds the tires on the track, but crew chiefs like Steve Letarte describe it as a 'warm and fuzzy feeling' when you have it. Whether mechanical or aerodynamic, more is always better.

SCIENCE OF SPEED: FRICTION AND HEAT

submitted by: nsf

Friction always creates heat. Brakes and tires depend on friction to work, but more friction isn’t always better. In the engine, friction is never good and engine builders use everything from oil to high-tech coatings to get a little extra horsepower.

SCIENCE OF SPEED: CAR SAFETY

submitted by: nsf

Conservation of energy explains how NASCAR's new car helped driver Michael McDowell walk away from a scary crash at Texas Motor Speedway in 2008.

Broadband CARS Microscopy Overview and Applications

submitted by: icamvid

Marcus Cicerone gives a talk at the LC2CAM 08 conference about CARS microscopy, 2 and 3-color CARS, NRB suppression, and signal extraction.

Modern Transportation and Infectious Disease – MWV15

submitted by: MicrobeWorld
From your local bus route to international air travel, infectious diseases can spread across the globe in a matter of hours. In this video podcast episode filmed at the Koshland Science Museum in Washington, D.C., Stephen Eubank from the Virginia Bioinformatics Institute of Virginia Tech and Daniel Lucey from Georgetown University discuss the role of transportation in the spread of disease and examine the effectiveness of various measures to curb transmission. Stephen Eubank, Ph.D., is a...