Approaches to Evaluating and Improving Lithium-Ion Battery Safety

submitted by: RASEIBoulder
As lithium-ion battery technologies mature, the size and energy of these systems continues to increase for emerging applications in transportation, grid storage, military use and aerospace. In fact, broadening the application space for lithium-ion batteries from the consumer electronics industries to these emerging markets increases their size from 1-50 Wh batteries for smart phones and laptops to >50 kWh for electric vehicles (EVs) and MWh scale for utility storage systems. As these...

New Perspectives of Energy Storage Materials

submitted by: RASEIBoulder
Summary: Energy storage in the electrochemical form is attractive because of its high efficiency and fast response time. New and improved materials for energy storage are urgently required to make more efficient use of our finite supply of fossil fuels, and to enable the effective use of renewable energy sources. In this seminar, I will discuss a few new perspectives for energy storage materials including new Li intercalation compounds, new Na intercalation compounds and new...

Batteries for Hybridization and Electrification of Vehicles

submitted by: RASEIBoulder
Summary: More than 30% of US energy and 90% of oil consumption are used for roadway transportation. Hybridization and electrification of vehicles on roadways are considered as major strategies for reducing dependence on oil and greenhouse gas and meeting the aggressive fuel economy standards. Hybridization of conventional internal combustion engine vehicles with motors run on electricity from batteries can significantly improve fuel efficiency while electrocution allows switch of the fuel to...

GREEN REVOLUTION: HYDROGEN

submitted by: nsf
Host Lisa Van Pay meets with NSF-funded scientists Yang-Shao Horn and Yogi Surendranath at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology as they take on the hydrogen energy challenge. Hydrogen bonds are an extremely efficient way to store energy, and scientists would like to capture this energy to power all sorts of things—from cars to laptops. Unlike other fuel sources, hydrogen can’t be harvested easily, so we have to make it. From the importance of developing an effective catalyst to...

GREEN REVOLUTION: ELECTRIC VEHICLES

submitted by: nsf
Host Lisa Van Pay visits the scientists and engineers working to make the electric car of the future a reality today. One of the toughest parts is storing enough potential energy to get you where you’re going, and in this case, it’s all about the battery. Graduate student Katharine Stroukoff from the University of Texas-Austin explains how her research may help build a better battery, while Mike Nawrot and Dan Lauber, members of the MIT electric vehicle team, describe the advantages of...

SCIENCE OF SPEED: MOMENTUM AND TIME

submitted by: nsf

Increasing the time of a collision from a tenth of a second to two tenths of a second can make a huge difference in the number of G's a driver experiences. The car, the track, seat belts, and seat construction spread out the force of impact and save lives.

SCIENCE OF SPEED: TURNING

submitted by: nsf

Anyone can go fast straight: The challenge is turning. It takes more than ten thousand pounds of force to get a racecar around Turn 3 at Texas Motor Speedway at 180 mph. All that force comes from four tiny patches of rubber--the only thing keeping the car on the track and out of the wall.

SCIENCE OF SPEED: TIRES AND PRESSURE

submitted by: nsf

NASCAR tires don't have "air pressure" because they're filled with nitrogen. The culprit responsible for increasing tire pressure during a race is friction. Using dry nitrogen gas helps the team predict how hot the tire will get and how much the pressure will "build" during a race.

SCIENCE OF SPEED: POWER

submitted by: nsf

850 horses all lined up--that's how much power a NASCAR Sprint Cup engine has. The engine's job is to convert the energy in fuel to speed. NASCAR engines do it faster and more efficiently than passenger car engines.

SCIENCE OF SPEED: LOAD TRANSFER

submitted by: nsf

NASCAR corners are divided into three parts because the car's grip changes in different parts of a turn. The higher center of gravity in the new car challenges crew chiefs to minimize weight shift around a turn. Equipment like the seven-post rig helps, but the ultimate test is on the track.