Francis H. Arnold: Laboratory Evolution (MWV55)

submitted by: MicrobeWorld
In episode 55 of MicrobeWorld Video, filmed at the American Association for the Advancement of Science Meeting in Washington, D.C., on February 18, 2011, Dr. Stan Maloy talks with Francis H. Arnold, Ph.D., Dick and Barbara Dickinson Professor of Chemical Engineering, Bioengineering and Biochemistry, at the California Institute of Technology. Maloy talks with Arnold about laboratory evolution to generate novel and useful enzymes and organisms for applications in medicine and in alternative...

Cyberinfrastructure-intensive applications at the Palomar Observatory

submitted by: Monika

In this video, Scott Kardel of the California Institute of Technology describes cyberinfrastructure-intensive applications at the Palomar Observatory, with a specific focus on the new and exciting Palomar Transient Factory.

Computational Protein Design Part 2: Designing Protein Libraries and an Example of Making a Better Fluorescent Protein (33:50)

submitted by: video_collector
In this lecture, I discuss the challenges of designing new proteins that fold into a particular structure or perform a particular function. One method is to computationally design a protein based solely upon our knowledge of amino acids and protein folding, a hard task but one which has had recent successes. Another approach is to screen combinatorial libraries of proteins for a desired function. In particular, I will discuss how structure-based computational methods can allow for high...

Danger from the Wild: HIV, Can We Conquer It? Part 3: The Grand Challenge: Engineering Immunity (18:51)

submitted by: video_collector
In this last segment, I describe another gene therapy strategy for HIV in which we propose to develop antibody-like proteins that can be expressed by a patient's B cells and will target the HIV virus for destruction. To achieve this objective, hematopoietic (blood) stem cells must to be targeted with the gene, which will ultimately develop into B cells that express the therapeutic molecule. The ultimate goal is to produce a life-long supply of anti-HIV neutralizing antibodies. In this...

Danger from the Wild: HIV, Can We Conquer It?": Part 2: Why Gene Therapy Might be a Reasonable Tool for Attacking HIV (30:08)"

submitted by: video_collector
In part 2, I describe the growing health problem that is facing the world with the spread of HIV and the limitations of current drug therapies and vaccine strategies. We need new ideas for tackling this problem. Here and in the next segment, I describe bold strategies of using gene therapy to conquer HIV, The approach that I describe in this segment involves gene therapy to produce short hairpin RNAs (siRNA) that target the destruction of a critical co-receptor of HIV, which the viruses that...

New Insights Into Lignocellulose Conversion by Termite Gut Microbes

submitted by: dougramsey

Termites and their complex hindgut microbiota are able to convert wood lignocellulose into hydrogen and other products used to fuel their metabolisms. Recent gene and genome and metagenome based analyses on the gut community have revealed novel insights into many bacteria-mediated, important symbiotic functions. The system-wide gene analysis of a microbial community specialized towards plant lignocellulose degradation has both basic and applied implications.

Design and Testing of Protein Combinatorial Libraries - Part 1: Introduction to Protein Design by Computation (31:09)

submitted by: video_collector
In this lecture, I discuss the challenges of designing new proteins that fold into a particular structure or perform a particular function. One method is to computationally design a protein based solely upon our knowledge of amino acids and protein folding, a hard task but one which has had recent successes. Another approach is to screen combinatorial libraries of proteins for a desired function. In particular, I will discuss how structure-based computational methods can allow for high...

Danger from the Wild: HIV, Can We Conquer It? by David Baltimore, Feb. 2007 - Part 1: Introduction to Viruses: HIV and Non-equilibrium Viruses (34:06)

submitted by: video_collector
In this set of lectures, I describe the threat facing the world from the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and a bold proposal on how we might meet the challenge of eliminating this disease by engineering the immune system. In part 1, I provide a broad introduction to viruses, describing their basic properties and my own history of studying the replication RNA viruses which led to the discovery of reverse transcriptase. I also illustrate the distinguishing features of equilibrium viruses...