First-year progress in MD Anderson’s Moon Shots Program

submitted by: mdanderson
The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in September 2012 announced its Moon Shots Program, an unprecedented effort to dramatically accelerate the pace of converting scientific discoveries into clinical advances that reduce cancer deaths. The program initially targets acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS); chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL); lung cancer; melanoma; prostate cancer; and triple-negative breast and high-grade serious ovarian cancers....

MD Anderson Physician Receives Award for Decades of Accomplishments

submitted by: mdanderson

Gabriel Hortobagyi, M.D., reflects on his accomplishments, thoughts on receiving the McGuire Award and where the field of breast cancer is headed in the future.

UT MD Anderson Cancer Center launches unprecedented Moon Shots Program to increase patient survival during the next decade

submitted by: mdanderson
Inspired by America’s drive a generation ago to put a man on the moon, MD Anderson’s Moon Shots Program is a highly-concentrated effort to rapidly and dramatically decrease suffering and death in several major cancers, including acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS); chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL); lung; melanoma; prostate and two cancers linked at the molecular level: triple-negative breast and ovarian. Focused teams are building on new technology and...

Circulating tumor cells may predict prognosis in early breast cancer

submitted by: mdanderson
A study published in the June Lancet Oncology reports early stage breast cancer patients who produce circulating tumor cells (CTC) may be at greater risk for breast cancer recurrence. Until now, lymph node biopsy has been the best predictor of prognosis. More research is needed to learn how to apply this new discovery, but the study is a step forward in understanding what is happening biologically. Anthony Lucci, M.D., professor, and Isabelle Bedrosian, M.D., associate professor, both in...

Tips to Help Kids Avoid Adult Cancers

submitted by: mdanderson

Beverly Gor, Ed.D., postdoctoral fellow in the Center for Health Equity and Evaluation Research at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, discusses healthy lifestyle choices you can make for your children to help prevent the development of certain adult cancers; such as prostate, breast and colon. Gor stresses the importance of healthy nutrition and exercise to reduce the risk of developing cancer later in life.

Dr. Cohen's Clinical Trial for Breast Cancer Patients

submitted by: mdanderson

Lorenzo Cohen, Ph.D., discusses a new clinical trial that will test the effects of lifestyle changes on cancer recurrence. Breast cancer patients in the study will receive coaching on nutrition, exercise, stress reduction and strengthening their social connections.

Breast Cancer -- It Doesn't Just Strike Women

submitted by: mdanderson
There were about 1,970 new cases of invasive breast cancer diagnosed among men in the United States in 2010. Yet, because of the lack of awareness, diagnosis normally happens at a late stage. Breast cancer is branded a female disease, so males must brave the pink ribbons, women-only waiting rooms, etc. There are similarities and differences in male and female breast cancer. Sharon Giordano, M.D., associate professor and internist in the Department of Breast Medical Oncology at MD...

Making Sense of Hormone Replacement Therapy & Breast Cancer Risk

submitted by: mdanderson
Jennifer Litton M.D. makes sense of hormone replacement therapy and its relationship to your risk of getting breast cancer. Please visit: www.mdanderson.org/prevention for more information regarding prevention and screening. Dr. Jennifer Litton, Assistant Professor of Breast Medical Oncology, at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center discusses hormone replacement therapy and breast cancer risk. View other videos at www.mdanderson.org/videos

Dream Team targets molecular factors common in women's cancers

submitted by: mdanderson

First clinical trials begin soon to test new drugs against ovarian, endometrial and breast cancers that harbor dysfunctional PI3K pathways. MD Anderson's Gordon Mills explains.

Breast cancer genes protect against some leukemias and lymphomas

submitted by: BernardFriedenson
Carriers of mutations in the breast cancer genes BRCA1 or BRCA2 have very high lifetime risks for breasts/ovarian cancer. Products of either gene have multiple functions including involvement in error-free double strand break repair. BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are both components of a DNA damage response pathway that has the ability to return fragments of broken chromosomes back into their correct positions without ligating them elsewhere. But cancers at other sites may also occur without this...