Optogenetics relies on biodiversity

submitted by: nsf

How two unlikely microbes (that don’t even have brains) led to the development of one of today’s most promising brain research techniques—which is being used to study many diseases including schizophrenia and Parkinson’s.

Walt Wilczynski discusses research on the responses by non-mammals to signals during mating competitions

submitted by: nsf

Walter Wilczynski of Georgia State University is researching how non-mammals signal one another in mating competitions, and how these signals influence the behavior of individual males and females. According to Wilczynski's research, an individual's behavioral responses to such signals and whether it loses or wins a mating competition may modify its brain in ways that may influence its future behavior.

Hans Hofmann explains how environment and genetics influence the brains and behavior of cichlid fish

submitted by: nsf
Hans Hofmann of the University of Texas, Austin, is researching the influences of environment and genetics on the brains and behavior of cichlid fish. Cichlids provide excellent model organisms for such studies because thousands of species of cichlids have evolved; many of these species are genetically similar but behaviorally and socially different from one another. Hofmann is using the diversity of cichlid species to help identify which genes regulate various behaviors and evaluate how...

Melina Hale explains how her research of zebrafish is helping to advance brain research

submitted by: nsf

Melina Hale of the University of Chicago is studying neuronal circuits in zebrafish that generate startle responses. Because little is known about how circuits operate in any organism and because startle responses are controlled by relatively simple circuits, an improved understanding of the circuitry of the zebrafish's startle responses is expected to help lay the groundwork for research on more complicated circuits.

Clifton Ragsdale reveals why octopuses are such successful predators

submitted by: nsf

Clifton Ragsdale of the University of Chicago is researching the nervous system of the octopus, which is a successful predator partly because it has excellent eyesight--the best of any invertebrate. The octopus's excellent eyesight enables it to visually zero in and focus on prey.

Partha Mitra explains his mouse brain research

submitted by: nsf

Partha Mitra of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory is currently focused on the Mouse Brain Architecture Project (MAP), which is aimed at creating 3-D maps of the mouse brain at various scales.

Novel cell-based and materials science approach to target Glioblastoma brain cancer tumors

submitted by: nsf

Stefan Bossmann and Deryl Troyer at Kansas State University are developing a novel materials treatment method for persons with brain cancer that uses a type of white blood cell to deliver anticancer drugs to particularly virulent brain tumors.

Central nervous system tumors symptoms and treatment

submitted by: mdanderson
Download from iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/itunes-u/central-nervous-system-tumors/id431... A central nervous system tumor starts as a primary cancer originating in the brain, spinal cord or spinal fluid and then spreads to the nervous system. The most common form is glioblastoma multiforme. John DeGroot, M.D., associate professor in Neuro-Oncology at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, discusses symptoms, diagnosis and treatment of central nervous system tumors.

What Is Alzheimers

submitted by: ZekelHealthcare

By 2010 there will be one-half million patients per year. By 2050 that number will reach one million new patients per year. Globally, there are approximately 26 ½ million patients with Alzheimer’s disease that is roughly 1 in 8! Every 71 seconds today, someone in America develops Alzheimer’s disease!

Science Nation - Brain Machine Interface

submitted by: nsf
Imagine living a life in which you are completely aware of the world around you but you're prevented from engaging in it because you are completely paralyzed. Even speaking is impossible. For an estimated 50,000 Americans this is a harsh reality. It's called locked-in syndrome, a condition in which people with normal cognitive brain activity suffer severe paralysis, often from injuries or an illness such as Lou Gehrig's disease. Boston University neuroscientist Frank Guenther works with the...