Walt Wilczynski discusses research on the responses by non-mammals to signals during mating competitions

submitted by: nsf

Walter Wilczynski of Georgia State University is researching how non-mammals signal one another in mating competitions, and how these signals influence the behavior of individual males and females. According to Wilczynski's research, an individual's behavioral responses to such signals and whether it loses or wins a mating competition may modify its brain in ways that may influence its future behavior.

Science Nation - Orangutan Copycats

submitted by: nsf
How smart are copy cats? Maybe it depends on your species You know the saying "monkey see, monkey do?" How about "orangutan see, orangutan do?" If that holds true, the small orangutan peering over his mother's shoulder in an enclosure at Zoo Atlanta should learn how to get a tasty treat just by watching how she gets one. For more information and more ScienceNation videos, go to http://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/science_nation/index.jsp

Science Nation - Fascinating Flight

submitted by: nsf

Using wind tunnels, lasers and high-speed cameras, University of Montana researcher Ken Dial studies ground birds for clues about the origins and mechanics of flight.

For more Science Nation, visit: http://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/science_nation/index.jsp

Science Nation - Sounds of Survival

submitted by: nsf

They are quiet as church mice ... or are they? See how eavesdropping on mice provides clues about how humans process sound.

Science Nation - Science of Shopping

submitted by: nsf
Go into any grocery store and cameras may be watching you. These cameras are not looking for thieves, they're looking for shoppers! The cameras are focused on the tops of peoples' heads (so it's anonymous), but they don't have to see faces to track which store aisles get the most traffic and how long consumers spend looking over products. With support from the National Science Foundation, computer scientist and CEO of VideoMining Rajeev Sharma and his team have designed software that...

Sitting and Health American Journal of Preventive Medicine

submitted by: abauman

American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Special Issue, Sitting and Health. Volume 41, Issue 2. August 2011.

Genetic Contribution To Variation In Cognitive Function In Twins

submitted by: Koten

Genetic Contribution To Variation In Cognitive Function In Twins As Assessed With Functional MR Imaging.
This video shows that the brain activity patterns of MZ twins are more similar then brain activity patterns of siblings.

Self-recognizing elephant

submitted by: andrewsun

This video is one the items of the supporting information of the 2006 paper, 'Self-recognition in an Asian elephant' (PNAS November 7, 2006 vol. 103 no. 45 17053-17057). The study titled has found that elephants, like humans, chimpanzees, and dolphins, recognize themselves in mirrors. Robert Siegel talks with Joshua Plotnik, a gradate student in psychology at Emory University's Yerkes National Primate Research Center, who co-authored the study.

Order in Spontaneous Behavior

submitted by: brembs
Brains are usually described as input/output systems: they transform sensory input into motor output. However, the motor output of brains (behavior) is notoriously variable, even under identical sensory conditions. The question of whether this behavioral variability merely reflects residual deviations due to extrinsic random noise in such otherwise deterministic systems or an intrinsic, adaptive indeterminacy trait is central for the basic understanding of brain function. Instead of random...
Authors: Alexander Maye, Chih-hao Hsieh, George Sugihara, B Bre