SDSU Geological Sciences Webinar - Stephen T. Hasiotis

submitted by: tcarrasc
Ichnology for the 21st Century: Understanding the differences between continental and marine trace fossils, with implications to the diversity, distribution, and evolution of soil biota ; Department of Geological Sciences, San Diego State University, Seminar Series ; The study of ichnology has come a long way since its inception and it continues to evolve. In particular, progress is being made in understanding the implications of trace fossils in the continental realm and how they can be...

Cell-Cell Communication in Bacteria by Bonnie Bassler, June 2008 - Part 1: Bacterial Quorum Sensing: Intra- and Inter-Species Communication (53:48)

submitted by: video_collector
Bacteria, primitive single-celled organisms, communicate with chemical languages that allow them to synchronize their behavior and thereby act as enormous multi-cellular organisms. This process is called quorum sensing and it enables bacteria to successfully infect and cause disease in plants, animals, and humans. Investigations of the molecular mechanisms underlying quorum sensing are leading to the development of novel strategies to interfere with quorum sensing. These strategies form the...

Cell Organization & Cell Motility by Julie Theriot - Part 1: Cell Motility and the Cytoskeleton: Protein Polymers Crawling Cells and Comet Tails (43:53)

submitted by: video_collector
This lecture covers the biochemical basis of actin-based motility (focusing on the pathogen Listeria as a model system for this process), the biophysical mechanism of polymerization-based force generation, and an evolutionary perspective of cell shape in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. The first part covers our understanding of how cells use the actin cytoskeleton to crawl. The pathogenic bacteria Listeria (which causes food poisoning) uses the actin cytoskeleton to propel itself in the...

Host-Pathogen Interaction and Human Disease: Part 1: What is a Pathogen? Trying to Understand Human Biology by the Study of Pathogenic Bacteria (37:48)

submitted by: video_collector
Ninety percent of the cells humans carry are microbes. Only a few of the bacteria we encounter are pathogenic and can cause disease. Pathogens possess the inherent ability to cross anatomic barriers or breach other host defenses that limit the microbes that make up our normal flora. A significant part of human evolution has gone into developing ways to thwart microbial intrusion. In turn, microbes have come up with clever ways to avoid and circumvent host defenses but human — microbe...

Antibiotics: Is a Strong Offense the Best Defense? (Part 3 of 3) MWV23

submitted by: MicrobeWorld
In the final episode of this 3 part video series on how to optimize antibiotic use and minimize the emergence of drug resistant pathogens, Dr. Linda Tollefson, Assistant Commissioner for Science at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, goes in depth on the use of antimicrobial drugs in agriculture, their efficacy, and adverse human health consequences. Dr. Stuart Levy, professor of Molecular Biology and Microbiology at Tufts University School of Medicine, discusses policy, regulatory and...

Antibiotics: Is a Strong Offense the Best Defense? (Part 2 of 3) MWV

submitted by: MicrobeWorld
On September 18, 2008 at the Koshland Science Museum in Washington, D.C., Dr. Stuart Levy, professor of Molecular Biology and Microbiology at Tufts University School of Medicine and Dr. Linda Tollefson, Assistant Commissioner for Science at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, discussed how to optimize antibiotic use and how to minimize the emergence of drug resistant pathogens. In part 2 of this 3 part video series, Dr. Levy discusses how antibiotic resistance develops, the development...

Antibiotics: Is a Strong Offense the Best Defense? (Part 1 of 3) MWV

submitted by: MicrobeWorld
Will we become defenseless against bacteria? Will bacteria always find a way to infect and even kill us? The emergence of antibiotic resistant strains of bacteria poses an enormous problem around the world. Scientists believe that the overuse of antibiotics is increasing the appearance of these pathogens. In the US, increasing casualties resulting from drug resistant staphylococcus infections received wide media attention. While antibiotics only work on bacterial infections, many patients...

"A genomic encyclopedia of bacteria and archaea" talk by Jonathan Eisen

submitted by: phylogenomics

A talk at the GME (Genomes, Medicine and Environment) Conference in 2007 by Jonathan A. Eisen. The talk is about the creation of "A Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea - GEBA"

The One Health Initiative MWV18

submitted by: MicrobeWorld
Ronald Atlas, former President for the American Society for Microbiology, discusses the new One Health Initiative that recognizes the inter-relationships among human, animal, and environmental health and seeks to enhance communication, cooperation, and collaboration in integrating these areas for the health and well-being of all species. Development of the One Health Initiative began in 2007 with the American Veterinary Medical Association's (AVMA) efforts to strengthen communications and...

Super Cloth - Partners Video Magazine

submitted by: csrees

Using nanotechnology, Cornell scientists created a fabric that can detect biohazards like E. coli and other pathogens. Super Cloth is a segment from Partners Video Magazine's latest episode, The Science of Small. To view the entire episode visit: http://www.csrees.usda.gov/newsroom/partners/partners.html