What Genomes Can Tell Us About the Past by Sydney Brenner - Part 2: (42:36)

submitted by: video_collector

In the second part of talk, I explore other clues that suggest that genomes are not at equilibrium. Some genes appear to be changing more slowly and these older "fossil" genes in modern day genomes may give us insight into the distant past. I also hope to convince you that many of the great mysteries in contemporary biology do not require big research labs but can be solved through "home genomics"- piecing together information through a computer, the internet, and an inquisitive mind.

Protein Modeling Practice: Zinc Fingers

submitted by: zardecki

Demonstration of how to build a 3D toober model of a zinc finger using the RCSB PDB website and Jmol

Design and Testing of Protein Combinatorial Libraries - Part 1: Introduction to Protein Design by Computation (31:09)

submitted by: video_collector
In this lecture, I discuss the challenges of designing new proteins that fold into a particular structure or perform a particular function. One method is to computationally design a protein based solely upon our knowledge of amino acids and protein folding, a hard task but one which has had recent successes. Another approach is to screen combinatorial libraries of proteins for a desired function. In particular, I will discuss how structure-based computational methods can allow for high...

What Genomes Can Tell Us About the Past by Sydney Brenner - Part 1: (39:06)

submitted by: video_collector
By looking at the light from distant galaxies and having well-established calibration methods, astrophysics can make hypotheses about the history of our universe. Do we have similar "rulers" in biology that could allow us to reconstruct the remote past and the evolution of species on this planet? The answer is likely "yes" and the clues are undoubtedly contained in the many whole genome sequences that are now available for inspection. However, it is critical to evaluate the assumptions that...

Atoms to X-rays: How Do Proteins Fold? Theory Meets Experiments

submitted by: video_collector
The machinery of life depends on proteins--large organic molecules composed of tens, hundreds or even thousands of amino acids bound together and folded into specifically shaped structures. How they fold into these three-dimensional structures is known as the second genetic code and is one of great challenges in science today. Join UCSD biophysicist Jose Onuchic, as he explores how physics, chemistry, biology and mathematics are all being applied to crack the protein folding mystery. Series:...

Protein Synthesis

submitted by: jmath

A demosntration of Protein synthesis expressed through dance. The film was directed in 1971 by Robert Alan Weiss for the Department of Chemistry of Stanford University and narrated by Paul Berg, a 1980 Nobel Prize winner for Chemistry. It is imprinted with the "free love" aura of the period, and continues to be shown in biology classes today. It has inspired a series of similar funny attempts at vulgarizing protein synthesis.