SCIENCE OF THE WINTER OLYMPICS: BANKING ON SPEED

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The winter games in Vancouver provide a chance for the United States' four-man bobsled team to win its first gold medal in more than 60 years. And with the help of Paul Doherty, senior scientist at the Exploratorium in San Francisco, Deborah King, associate professor in the Department of Exercise and Sports Sciences at Ithaca College, physicist George Tuthill of Plymouth State University, and bobsled designer Bob Cuneo, the team explains how they hope to accomplish this feat.

SCIENCE OF THE WINTER OLYMPICS: DOWNHILL SCIENCE

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In February, Olympic skiers such as Julia Mancuso, Ted Ligety, Marco Sullivan and Scott Macartney will race down Vancouver's Whistler Mountain at speeds of up to 90 miles an hour. Paul Doherty, senior scientist at the Exploratorium in San Francisco, and Sam Colbeck, a retired scientist from the U.S. Army Cold Regions lab, explain the physics of this downhill thrill ride.

SCIENCE OF SPEED: DRAG & DRAFTING

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Engine power is constrained at superspeedways like Daytona and Talladega, so teams use aerodynamics to gain an advantage. Teams adjust their cars to minimize drag, but then it's up to the drivers to find 'the draft' and to trust the drivers behind them to literally "bump" them into Victory Lane.

Science of NFL Football - Geometric Shapes

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"Science of NFL Football" is a 10-part video series funded by the National Science Foundation and produced in partnership with the National Football League. In this segment, NBC's Lester Holt looks at the role geometric shapes play every time an NFL quarterback throws a pass. With the help of former NFL quarterback Joey Harrington, Professor Tony Schmitz of the University of Florida explains why the shape of the football allows quarterbacks to be so accurate when throwing the ball to their...