Sitting-Time, Physical Activity, and Depressive Symptoms in Mid-Aged Women

submitted by: jannique.van.uffelen
Background: Associations of sitting-time and physical activity with depression are unclear. Purpose: To examine concurrent and prospective associations between both sitting-time and physical activity with prevalent depressive symptoms in mid-aged Australian women. Methods: Data were from 8950 women, aged 50–55 years in 2001, who completed mail surveys in 2001, 2004, 2007, and 2010. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression questionnaire....
Authors: Jannique van Uffelen, Yolanda van Gellecum, Nicola Burton, Geeske Peeters, Kristiann Heesch, Wendy Brown

Healthy aging for the cancer patient

submitted by: mdanderson

“Being a senior does not necessarily mean that you’re old,” says Beatrice Edwards, M.D., associate professor in geriatric medicine at MD Anderson Cancer Center. “Yet, it’s important for elderly cancer patients to have their functional status evaluated in order to achieve successful cancer treatment outcomes.” In this podcast, Edwards shares tips on healthy aging for older adults and explains the role that a geriatrician can play in cancer treatment and survivorship.

Computer Activities, Physical Exercise, Aging, and Mild Cognitive Impairment:

submitted by: WentzMR
Dr. Yonas Geda, a physician scientist at Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Arizona, USA, discusses his article appearing in the May 2012 issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings. The study shows a synergistic interaction between computer use and moderate physical exercise in being associated with a decreased odds of having mild cognitive impairment, the intermediate stage between normal aging and dementia. Available at: http://www.mayoclinicproceedings.org/article/S0025-6196(12)00304-7/fulltext

Embryonic stem-cell-preconditioned microenvironment induces loss of cancer cell properties in human melanoma cells

submitted by: cmjones
The cancer microenvironment affects cancer cell proliferation and growth. Embryonic stem (ES)-preconditioned 3-dimensional (3-D) culture of cancer cells induces cancer cell reprogramming and results in a change in cancer cell properties such as differentiation and migration in skin melanoma. However, the mechanism has not yet been clarified. Using the ES-preconditioned 3-D microenvironment model, we provide evidence showing that the ES microenvironment inhibits proliferation and...
Authors: M. o. Kim, S. h. Kim, N. Oi, M. h. Lee, D. h. Yu, D. j. Kim, E. j. Cho, A. m. Bode, Y. y. Cho, T. g. Bowden, Z. Dong

How Does Aging Affect Your Heart?

submitted by: ZRT_Laboratory

Dr. Sanjay Kapur, ZRT Laboratory Scientific Director, talks about how the process of aging affects our heart health.

A variant of the HTRA1 gene increases susceptibility to age-related macular degeneration

submitted by: KuoOffice
Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of irreversible vision loss in the developed world and has a strong genetic predisposition. A locus at human chromosome 10q26 affects the risk of AMD, but the precise gene(s) have not been identified. We genotyped 581 AMD cases and 309 normal controls in a Caucasian cohort in Utah. We demonstrate that a single-nucleotide polymorphism, rs11200638, in the promoter region of HTRA1 is the most likely causal variant for AMD at 10q26...
Authors: Kang Zhang

Genes and Cells that Determine the Lifespan of C. elegans - Part 2: The Regulation of Aging by Signals from the Reproductive System, and, also, a Link Between Aging and Tumor Growth (37:16)

submitted by: video_collector
Once it was thought that aging was just a random and haphazard process. Instead, the rate of aging turns out to be subject to regulation by transcription factors that respond to hormones and other signals. In the nematode C. elegans, in which many key discoveries about aging were first made, the aging process is subject to regulation by food intake, sensory perception, and signals from the reproductive system. Changing genes and cells that affect aging can lengthen lifespan by six fold, and...

Genes and Cells that Determine the Lifespan of C. elegans - Part 1: An Evolutionarily-Conserved Regulatory System for Aging (42:46)

submitted by: video_collector
Once it was thought that aging was just a random and haphazard process. Instead, the rate of aging turns out to be subject to regulation by transcription factors that respond to hormones and other signals. In the nematode C. elegans, in which many key discoveries about aging were first made, the aging process is subject to regulation by food intake, sensory perception, and signals from the reproductive system. Changing genes and cells that affect aging can lengthen lifespan by six fold, and...

Successful Aging: The Buzz on Successful Aging

submitted by: sjanderson

What does it mean to age successfully? After all, aren’t we accomplishing this just by being alive? The term "successful aging" is vague and leaves much to the imagination. Yet, there is a growing interest in this topic. UCSD’s Stein Institute for Research on Aging has embarked on its own research project to discover the secrets to success. This presentation provides insights related to successful aging and discuss current research findings and proposed models.