Ouch! Single Cell Wound Repair in Drosophila Embryos

submitted by: JCB
Individual cells must quickly repair any disruptions to their plasma membrane. Abreu-Blanco et al. describe how early Drosophila embryos remodel their membranes and cytoskeleton to seal cell surface wounds. This biosights episode presents the paper by Abreu-Blanco et al. from the May 2, 2011 issue of The Journal of Cell Biology, and includes an interview with senior author Susan Parkhurst (Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA). Produced by Caitlin Sedwick and Ben Short....

Curbing the Killer Instinct

submitted by: JCB
Natural Killer (NK) cells distinguish target cells from surrounding healthy tissue by integrating signals from a variety of activating and inhibitory receptors. Abeyweera et al. reveal that signals from inhibitory receptors limit NK cell activity by remodeling contacts with potential targets and inducing NK cell retraction. This biosights episode presents the paper by Abeyweera et al. from the February 21st, 2011, issue of The Journal of Cell Biology, and includes an interview with senior...

A Turning Point for Macrophages

submitted by: JCB
Drosophila macrophages disperse themselves around the body during embryogenesis, ready to mount an immune response at the site of a wound. Stramer et al. image the cells in vivo, revealing that they form microtubule "arms" to point them in the right direction and push themselves away from their fellow leukocytes. This biosights episode presents the paper by Stramer et al. from the May 17th, 2010 issue of The Journal of Cell Biology, and includes an interview with lead author Brian Stramer....

The Human Oral Microbiome by Floyd Dewhirst, Harvard University

submitted by: dougramsey
The human oral cavity is a diverse habitat that contains approximately bacterial 600 predominant species. The oral microbiome is comprised of 44% named species, 12% isolates representing unnamed species, and 44% phylotypes known only from 16S rRNA based cloning studies. Species from 11 phyla have been identified: Firmicutes (211), Bacteroidetes (106), Proteobacteria (99), Actinobacteria (64), Spirochaetes (49), Fusobacteria (29), TM7 (12), Synergistetes (10), Chlamydiae (1), Chloroflexi (1)...