Data Management at University of Michigan Biological Station

submitted by: kkwaiser

This outlines the data management mandates recently implemented at the National Science Foundation and the response by the University of Michigan Biological Station to these mandates by Kyle Kwaiser. This talk and others were part of the Advanced Aquatic Sensors (AAS) Workshop funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and held at the University of Michigan Biological Station from September 12-13th, 2011.

From sensor selection to data return: lessons learned (Panel Session)

submitted by: kkwaiser
Each panel member was asked to open with a 5-7 minute narrative based on personal experience on the topic of advanced aquatic sensors. Team assembly, funding avenues, technology considerations, and any of the minutia involved in deploying and operating advanced aquatic sensors may be discussed. This talk and others were part of the Advanced Aquatic Sensors (AAS) Workshop funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and held at the University of Michigan Biological Station from September...

Introduction to GLEON and a high-level overview of aquatic sensors

submitted by: kkwaiser
This session, presented by Kevin Rose, will provide an overview of advanced aquatic sensors. The session will provide general information on a wide array of sensors. What types of sensors are available? What are the basic principles behind these sensor technologies? What are the limitations of these sensors and what are some typical sensor applications? Due to the broad use of sensors, sensor knowledge, and sensor applications, we will strive to make this session interactive amongst workshop...

Sensors, Networks, and Tools: communicating with sensors and managing the flood of data

submitted by: kkwaiser
Advances in sensor technology enable the monitoring of water quality in real time, with high frequency, and for extended time periods. In order to implement water quality observation with in situ sensors, users must consider the observing infrastructure and the cyberinfrastructure necessary for the collection, transmittal, storage, and sharing of resulting data. To facilitate sharing of and access to hydrologic data the Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Science,...

Introduction to ACT and Methods For Sensor Selection and Evaluation

submitted by: kkwaiser
The Alliance for Coastal Technologies (ACT) has been established to support sensor technology innovation and to provide the information required to select the most appropriate tools for studying and monitoring coastal and ocean environments. ACT is a consortium of nationally prominent ocean science and technology institutions and experts who provide credible performance data of these technologies through third-party, objective testing. ACT technology verifications include laboratory and...

Autonomous Sensor Networks for Water Quality and Biodiversity Assessment

submitted by: kkwaiser
Many marine and freshwater water environments are too large and dynamic for efficient and cost effective data collection by sensor networks or robotic systems alone. Wireless surface and underwater sensor networks allow large-scale data collection although at a generally lower spatial resolution. Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs) and Autonomous Surface Vehicles (ASVs) offer continuous data collection capabilities at a more localised (transect) scale. A method for improving capture of...

Introduction to High Throughput Computing

submitted by: kkwaiser
The large data volumes and complex models used today in environmental research and management can push even modern computers to their limits. This session will introduce you to the power of distributed computing. We'll learn about what distributed computing systems do, what kind of tasks they're best for, and how that can change the nature and scale of problems you can address. Condor, a freely available and open source distributed computing system, will be demonstrated and all example...

Virtual Observatory and Ecological Informatics System

submitted by: kkwaiser

Case study of aquatic sensor deployments, data management solutions and cyber-infrastructure at the Hancock Biological Station by Susan Hendricks. This talk and others were part of the Advanced Aquatic Sensors (AAS) Workshop funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and held at the University of Michigan Biological Station from September 12-13th, 2011.

Great Data for Great Lakes

submitted by: kkwaiser
The Great Lakes Observing System (GLOS) is a nonprofit organization established to advance the coordination of the extensive network of people, processes and technologies needed to improve access to critical information that supports the safety, economy, and health of the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River ecosystem. GLOS coordinates Great Lakes observations, information technology, data delivery products, and related services by developing a broad network of members and providing a forum...

Case study: North Temperate Lakes, WI

submitted by: kkwaiser

Overview of aquatic sensor deployments and related research ongoing at the North Temperate Lakes Long-Term Ecological Research site by Jordan Read. This talk and others were part of the Advanced Aquatic Sensors (AAS) Workshop funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and held at the University of Michigan Biological Station from September 12-13th, 2011.