CES 2014: Xandem Technology uses radio waves to monitor movement

submitted by: nsf

At the Consumer Electronics Show, CES 2014, Xandem Technology showed off a prototype that uses radio waves to track human body movement. Applications for this product could revolutionize industries like personal home security.

Xandem Technology is one of nearly 30 exhibitors funded by NSF this week at Eureka Park, which features new grassroots technology.

Read more: http://go.usa.gov/ZPvk

CES 2014: SmarterShade uses optical filters to revolutionize window shades

submitted by: nsf
This demo at the CES 2014 from small business SmarterShade shows one of several possible applications for their window shading technology--images hidden in glass revealed by the precise position of optical filters. Though smart window technology has been around for a while, cheaper, more adaptable options are needed. SmarterShade is one of nearly 30 exhibitors funded by NSF this week at Eureka Park, which features new grassroots technology. Read more: http://go.usa.gov/ZPvk

Science Behind the News: Quantum Computing

submitted by: nsf

Imagine if engineers could build a computer to be millions of times faster than anything that exists today, yet so small it’s microscopic. John Preskill, a theoretical physicist at the California Institute of Technology, explains the science behind quantum computing, the next great frontier in computer science. "Science Behind the News" is produced in partnership with NBC Learn.

Provided by the National Science Foundation & NBC Learn

Science Behind the News: Predictive Policing

submitted by: nsf

"The Los Angeles Police Department is using a new tactic in their fight against crime called “predictive policing.” It's a computer program that was originally developed by a team at UCLA, including mathematician Andrea Bertozzi and anthropologist Jeff Brantingham. “Science Behind the News” is produced in partnership with NBC Learn.

Provided by the National Science Foundation & NBC Learn

Harvesting Electricity: Triboelectric Generators Capture Wasted Power

submitted by: nsf

With one stomp of his foot, Zhong Lin Wang illuminates a thousand LED bulbs--with no batteries or power cord. A professor at the Georgia Institute of Technology, Wang is using what’s technically known as the triboelectric effect to create surprising amounts of electric power by rubbing or touching two different materials together.

Source: Georgia Institute of Technology

Generating Electricity More Efficiently with Multiphase Thermoelectric Converter

submitted by: MFerreiraJr
The Multiphase Thermoelectric Converter is a direct thermal-to-electrical energy conversion system designed in order to harvest most of the waste heat energy efficiently into electricity. Conceptually, it works by ionizing hot coolant in order to force it F=q(v × B) to push its ions against moving magnetic fields doing useful work converting thermal energy directly into electric power at high efficiency with almost no moving parts. Essentially, it can be comprised of two sets of concentric...