Leveraging the immune system to fight cancer – Biotech’s future

submitted by: nsf

Inventors are using small-scale biology and engineering to find ways to use the body’s natural defenses to effectively treat cancer. NSF-funded small business GigaGen uses microfluidics, bioinformatics and genome sequencing to look for antibodies that may be good candidates for new therapies. GigaGen’s David Johnson explained how at the 2014 BIO International Convention.

Clearing feeding tubes faster – Biotech’s future

submitted by: nsf

Feeding tubes often become clogged with medication and food, depriving patients of nutrition. NSF-funded small business Actuated Medical has invented an FDA-approved device that clears clogs quickly and cleanly. Roger Bagwell demonstrated how the device works at the 2014 BIO International Convention.

8 BEST PHP FRAMEWORKS FOR DEVELOPING AGILE APPLICATIONS FASTER

submitted by: Deaninfotech

PHP is one of the programming languages which is rocking the development world since the last few years due to its inherent flexibility and comparatively easier learning curve. But, developing perfect agile software applications in PHP has always been a challenging and time consuming task.

Helping health care technologies communicate

submitted by: nsf
Julian Goldman, a physician at Mass General Hospital, knows better than most the frustrations that doctors face when they're confronted with computer systems and devices that just won't communicate with each other. His lab has been a pioneer in developing open source tools and standards designed to integrate the various technologies used in homes and hospitals. The effort, in turn, led to the development of a community of likeminded researchers and manufacturers that would like to break...

Health care that follows you from home to hospital and back

submitted by: nsf
Professor Marjorie Skubic from the University of Missouri has created a suite of health care technologies that identify when an individual falls in their home or when their physical behavior changes over time. However, how does a physician at a hospital know about and use information gathered by devices like those designed by Skubic for the home? And likewise, how does information about a patient's condition in the hospital get incorporated into technologies like Skubic's when they return...

Local 3D printing hubs bring manufacturing back to U.S.

submitted by: nsf
Imaginestics is a start-up out of West Lafayette, Indiana, founded by Nainesh Rathod. At the Smart America Expo, Rathod was part of a team that demonstrated the potential impact of "Smart Shape Technology" on 3D printing and local manufacturing hubs. The system lets you can take a picture of a part of a larger device with a mobile phone, and then identify a local retailer where this part can be found or instantly print it at a local neighborhood 3D printing service provider. The...