Flip phones save the world - Scientists & Engineers on Sofas (and other furnishings)

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EcoATM founder Mark Bowles talks about the high-tech tools needed to turn flip phones and old electronics into a successful commercial enterprise that helps save the environment. Sarah Bates from the NSF sat down with Mark to discuss ecoATM and its rise from an idea in a coffee shop into a multimillion-dollar business. EcoATM runs kiosks placed all around the United States where people can turn in their unwanted electronics for cash. EcoATM accepts everything from old, useless flip...

What it Takes to Build the Next James Webb Space Telescope with Blake Bullock and Scott Willoughby

Northrop Grumman Astrophysicist, Blake Bullock, and Engineer, Scott Willoughby, share what it takes to build the next generation James Webb Space Telescope. Join in to lean about Blake’s job to understand the future and Scott’s role to bring that future to reality at the inaugural X-STEM Symposium in Washington, D.C. on April 24, 2014. The X-STEM Symposium is sponsored by MedImmune and the Northrop Grumman Foundation and is a program of the USA Science & Engineering Festival....

Computer Science Teachers Speak Out!

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Computer science teachers from across the country tell you what excites them about teaching computer science.

An in-mouth wafer to treat oral cancer– Biotech’s future

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To treat oral cancer, NSF-funded small business Privo Technologies has created a platform that delivers treatments directly to the affected area. Privo develops new classes of targeted treatments, such as chemotherapy drugs, designed to be delivered through the mouth’s mucous membranes. Privo founder Manijeh Goldberg talked about her company’s research at the 2014 BIO International Convention.

Faster, more sensitive imaging of live cells – Biotech’s future

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Developing new drugs means researchers must observe how cells react to those drugs over extended periods of time. NSF-funded small business Phi Optics has developed an optical microscope that lets scientists do just that -- study living cells in their natural environments. Catalin Chiritescu talked about how the technology works at the 2014 BIO International Convention.

Cancer-scanning device detects residual cancer cells post-surgery – Biotech’s future

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Despite a surgeon’s best efforts, residual cancer cells often remain after a tumor is removed. Now, a technology from NSF-funded small business NovaScan detects cancer cells in living tissue in real-time. The cancer-scanning device has already been used to find breast cancer cells. NovaScan’s William Gregory talked about how the wand works at the 2014 BIO International Convention.