Collective cell migration requires vesicular trafficking for chemoattractant delivery at the trailing edge

submitted by: JCB
Chemoattractant signaling induces the polarization and directed movement of cells secondary to the activation of multiple effector pathways. In addition, chemotactic signals can be amplified and relayed to proximal cells via the synthesis and secretion of additional chemoattractant. The mechanisms underlying such remarkable features remain ill defined. We show that the asymmetrical distribution of adenylyl cyclase (ACA) at the back of Dictyostelium discoideum cells, an essential determinant...
Authors: Paul Kriebel, Valarie Barr, Erin Rericha, Guofeng Zhang, Carole Parent

Plant biotech for food and environment

submitted by: pieter

A better knowledge ot the processes in plants can lead to plants that are better suited for food and environment.

Biotech for Health

submitted by: pieter

Fundamental biomedical research leads to hope against 'incurable' diseases, like ALS, cancer and Chron's

What Genomes Can Tell Us About the Past by Sydney Brenner - Part 2: (42:36)

submitted by: video_collector

In the second part of talk, I explore other clues that suggest that genomes are not at equilibrium. Some genes appear to be changing more slowly and these older "fossil" genes in modern day genomes may give us insight into the distant past. I also hope to convince you that many of the great mysteries in contemporary biology do not require big research labs but can be solved through "home genomics"- piecing together information through a computer, the internet, and an inquisitive mind.

"Reading & Writing Genomes" - George Church @ '09 DOE JGI User Meeting

submitted by: JGI
George Church (Harvard University) keynote talk for DOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI) '09 Church elaborates on the future direction and development of genomic sequensing and reducing the cost of genomic research, while increasing the efficiency and possibilities, inclusive of developing multivirus resistance genomes. User Meeting on March 26, 2009, with introduction by Len Pennacchio (JGI).George Church (Harvard University) keynote talk for DOE JGI '09 User Meeting on March 26, 2009, with...

The Origin of Vertebrates - Part 3: How Chordates Got Their Chord (19:09)

submitted by: video_collector

In Part 3: How chordates got their chord, Marc Kirschner (Harvard Medical School) discusses how the overall body plan of vertebrates, arose from the invertebrates based on knowledge of the commonalities in their developmental mechanisms. Here again, the acorn worm, offers the key comparison, being close enough to us to share some recognizable features, but far enough away to indicate the direction from whence we came.