Role of the Neural Crest in Vertebrate Development and Evolution: Part 3: The Molecular Control of the Neural Crest Contribution to Craniofacial and Brain Development (36:10)

submitted by: video_collector
Further studies have shown that the NC cells which participate in facial skeletogenesis correspond to the anteriormost region of the body axis where the genes of the Hox cluster are not expressed. If the forced expression of Hoxa2, Hoxa3 and Hoxb4 (the most anteriorly expressed Hox genes) is induced in this part of the neural fold, brain development is deeply affected with anencephaly and no skeletogenesis takes place in the face which fails to develop. This phenotype is reproduced when the...

Role of the Neural Crest in Vertebrate Development and Evolution - Part 2: The Role of the Neural Crest in Head Development and in Vertebrate Evolution (30:04)

submitted by: video_collector
Nicole Le Douarin shares her research on the role of the neural crest in skeletal development. The Q/C (quail/chick) marker system revealed that apart from the peripheral nervous system (PNS), the melanocytes and some endocrine tissues, the NC plays a major role in the construction of the vertebrate head. The entire facial skeleton and part of the skull (frontal, squamosal, parietal bones) are of NC origin together with the connective tissues of the face and ventral part of the neck. The...

The Problem of Regeneration: Part 3: Molecular Basis of Regeneration: Planarians as a Model System (43:54)

submitted by: video_collector

In the third and last part of this lecture, I will introduce the model system we have developed to study animal regeneration, the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea. I will review its anatomy, and the biological attributes that make these animals extraordinarily well suited to dissect the molecular and cellular basis of regeneration. I will also discuss recent work from my laboratory aimed at identifying molecules associated with regenerative capacities.

The Problem of Regeneration: Part 2: Principles of Planarian Regeneration (32:49)

submitted by: video_collector

In this second part of the lecture, I will briefly review the rich history of planarian research, followed by a summary of the central principles of planarian regeneration that have been derived from this extensive, often fascinating body of experimental work.

JAPANESE voice - Cell isolation of flow compatible mouse CD4+ T cells

submitted by: andrewinoslo

Easy-to-use kit allows you to gently isolate flow-compatible mouse CD4+ T cells. Immediately after positive isolation, the beads are released and removed from your cell sample. In this way, you avoid exposing your cells to potentially cytotoxic or immunogenic foreign substances like iron oxides or dextrans, a potential problem when working with biodegradable particles. In addition, your cells will not be exposed to the stress of being passed through a column.

Stem Cells: Biology and Promise for Regenerative Medicine: Part 2: Tapping the Potential of Adult Stem Cells (1:17:03)

submitted by: scivee-team
Stem cells have both the capacity to self-renew, that is, to divide and create additional stem cells, and also to differentiate along a specified molecular pathway. Embryonic stem cells are very nearly totipotent, reserving the elite privileges of choosing among most if not all of the differentiation pathways that specify the animal. In contrast, stem cells that reside within an adult organ or tissue have more restricted options, often able to select a differentiation program from only a few...