Carbonated Oceans

submitted by: ucsandiego

As carbon dioxide is pumped into the atmosphere, about one-third of the excess is taken up by the oceans, where it converts to an acidic form with potentially dangerous ecosystem consequences.

http://explorations.ucsd.edu/Features/2009/Carbonated_Oceans/

Scientists From Across the Globe Warn of Drastic Water Shortages

submitted by: ucsandiego
In the Sierra Neveda, snowpack will shrink by 30 to 90 percent by the end of the century. On the other side of the planet, in the Himalayas, about 70 percent of glaciers are set to disappear. These changes are both caused by climate change and will lead to dramatic water shortages for hundreds of millions of people across the globe, scientists said during a press conference Wednesday at UC San Diego. http://ucsdnews.ucsd.edu/thisweek/2009/05/11_icemelt.asp

2008 Tawani Antarcitc Expedition Video

submitted by: Edeker
In November 2008, an international team of distinguished scientists, educators and explorers embarked on a six week expedition to Antarctica. Their primary mission was to study the icy ecosystems of the Schirmacher Oasis and the perennially ice-covered Lake Untersee. In this exceptionally hostile environment, the team hoped to find a new species of "extremophile" - a hardy life form that exists and flourishes in conditions inhospitable to most known organisms. These discoveries could...

SDSU Geological Sciences Webinar - David King

submitted by: tcarrasc
The Cretaceous-Paleogene ("KT") Boundary In Belize and Alabama - David T. King, Jr., Department of Geology and Geography, Auburn University, Alabama: Belize - At Albion Island in northern Belize, Cretaceous-Paleogene (KT) boundary deposits, also known as the Albion formation, rest upon karsted and fractured Maastrichtian dolostones. These deposits consist of a basal impactoclastic clay layer (~ 1 to 2-m thick) and an upper carbonate-rich, coarse impactoclastic breccia layer (up to 15-m...

Calit2 Bluff Erosion Project

submitted by: alexmatthews

The cliffs along the San Diego coastline are more than just fodder for picture postcards — a number of residential homes sit perched atop them, and in certain areas, the railroad tracks that serve Amtrak and County Coaster come within several feet of the cliff edge.

Life Behind Bars

Marine biologists employ genetic barcoding in the quest to positively identify fish species