I-DOPA is an Endogenous for OA1

submitted by: medtv

Brian S. McKay; Vanessa M. Lopez; Christina L. Decatur; W. Daniel Stamer; Ronald M. Lynch

MacArthur Fellow 2008: Sally Temple, neuroscientist

submitted by: video_collector
Sally Temple is a neuroscientist tracing the natural interactions of differentiating neurons, bringing us closer to developing effective methods for treating central nervous system damage. MacArthur Fellowships offer the opportunity for Fellows to accelerate their current activities or take their work in new directions. The unusual level of independence afforded to Fellows underscores the spirit of freedom intrinsic to creative endeavors. The extraordinary creativity of MacArthur...

SYHS CyberBridge Inter-Session Institute 2008

submitted by: nbelanger

Using MS PowerPoint, Apple iMovie and Garageband SYHS student created the prototype project of their research work. This video is a teacher example of desired projects.

Bacterial Inclusion Bodies Contain Amyloid-Like Structure

linked profile(s): Lei Wang
submitted by: apryl
Protein aggregation is a process in which identical proteins self-associate into imperfectly ordered macroscopic entities. Such aggregates are generally classified as amorphous, lacking any long-range order, or highly ordered fibrils. Protein fibrils can be composed of native globular molecules, such as the hemoglobin molecules in sickle-cell fibrils, or can be reorganized β-sheet–rich aggregates, termed amyloid-like fibrils. Amyloid fibrils are associated with several...
Authors: David Eisenberg, Samir K Maji, Roland Riek, Michael R Sawaya, Lei Wang

Inductive Logic Programming Demo

submitted by: lciuffo

EELA-2 application demo: http://applications.eu-eela.eu/application_details.php?ID=37
Authors: Rui Camacho, Vítor Costa, Nuno Fonseca and Inês Dutra

Self-recognizing elephant

submitted by: andrewsun

This video is one the items of the supporting information of the 2006 paper, 'Self-recognition in an Asian elephant' (PNAS November 7, 2006 vol. 103 no. 45 17053-17057). The study titled has found that elephants, like humans, chimpanzees, and dolphins, recognize themselves in mirrors. Robert Siegel talks with Joshua Plotnik, a gradate student in psychology at Emory University's Yerkes National Primate Research Center, who co-authored the study.