Making Muscle: Tissue Engineering in MUSC's Department of Surgery

submitted by: mcgheek
Samir Fakhry, M.D., Chief of MUSC's Division of General Surgery, and Michael Yost, PhD, Associate Chair of Research in MUSC's Department of Surgery, discuss the promise of engineered tissues for the treatment of surgical and trauma patients. Engineered tissue can instruct the body to regenerate native tissue instead of generating scar, improving cosmetic and functional outcomes. Bioprinters, 3D printers for living tissue, will help realize the promise of engineered tissue for clinical care.k

Congenital Heart Defects: Could the Developing Heart Hold the Key to New Therapies?

submitted by: mcgheek

Andrew M. Atz, M.D., Chief of the Division of Pediatric Cardiology at MUSC's Children's Hospital, and Kyu-Ho Lee, M.D., PhD, a developmental biologist at MUSC's Cardiovascular Developmental Biology Center, discuss how better understanding the gene signaling involved in the embryonic development of the heart could lead to new adjunctive therapies for congenital heart defects. Learn more about Dr. Lee's work in the November 2013 issue of Progressnotes at MUSChealth.com/progressnotes

Unrelated Donor Bone Marrow Transplant for Sickle Cell Disease

submitted by: mcgheek
Jennifer Jaroscak, M.D., of MUSC Children's Hospital discusses bone marrow transplant (BMT) as a cure for patients with sickle cell disease. She describes a new reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) regimen being trialed at MUSC for BMTs from well-matched unrelated donors in the SCURT study. RIC is safer for unrelated donor transplant because, unlike myeloablative BMTs, it suppresses but does not destroy the patient's bone marrow. Find out more about the SCURT study and reduced-intensity...

Soft tissue wound healing around teeth and dental implants

submitted by: zmkbern
Abstract Aim: To provide an overview on the biology and soft tissue wound healing around teeth and dental implants. Material and Methods: This narrative review focuses on cell biology and histology of soft tissue wounds around natural teeth and dental implants. Results and conclusions: The available data indicate that: (a) Oral wounds follow a similar pattern. (b) The tissue specificities of the gingival, alveolar and palatal mucosa appear to be innately and not necessarily functionally...
Authors: A Sculean, R Gruber, DD Bosshardt

Effects of Periodontal Treatment on Lung Function and Exacerbation Frequency in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Chronic Periodontitis: A 2-Year Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

submitted by: xuanzhou
Abstract AIM: To evaluate the direct effects of periodontal therapy in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) patients with chronic periodontitis (CP). MATERIALS AND METHODS: In a pilot randomized controlled trial, 60 COPD patients with CP were randomly assigned to receive scaling and root planing (SRP) treatment, supragingival scaling treatment, or oral hygiene instructions only with no periodontal treatment. We evaluated their periodontal indexes, respiratory function and COPD...
Authors: Xuan Zhou, Jing Han, Zhiqiang Liu, Yiqing Song, Zuomin Wang, Zheng Sun

Supplementing a low protein diet with dibasic amino acids increases urinary calcium excretion in young women

submitted by: jld03009
Increasing dietary protein within a physiologic range stimulates intestinal calcium absorption, but it is not known if specific amino acids or dietary protein as a whole are responsible for this effect. Therefore, we selectively supplemented a lowprotein (0.7 g/kg) diet with either the calcium-sensing receptor-activating amino acids (CaSR-AAAs) L-tryptophan, L-phenylalanine, and L-histidine, or the dibasic amino acids (DAAs) L-arginine and L-lysine, to achieve intakes comparable to the...
Authors: Jessica Bihuniak, Rebecca Sullivan, Christine Simpson, Donna Caseria, Tania Huedo-Medina, Kimberly O’Brien, Jane Kerstetter, Karl Insogna