Host-Pathogen Interaction and Human Disease: Part 1: What is a Pathogen? Trying to Understand Human Biology by the Study of Pathogenic Bacteria (37:48)

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Ninety percent of the cells humans carry are microbes. Only a few of the bacteria we encounter are pathogenic and can cause disease. Pathogens possess the inherent ability to cross anatomic barriers or breach other host defenses that limit the microbes that make up our normal flora. A significant part of human evolution has gone into developing ways to thwart microbial intrusion. In turn, microbes have come up with clever ways to avoid and circumvent host defenses but human — microbe...

Malaria presented by Joseph DeRisi, June 2006 - Part 1: Malaria: Background & Overview (21:19)

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This brief set of three lectures gives a very general overview of malaria, the disease and Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of the most deadly form. Basic research as well as drug development efforts will also be covered in parts two and three of this series. For further information see: http://www.ascb.org/ibioseminars/DeRisi/DeRisi1.cfm

Danger from the Wild: HIV, Can We Conquer It? by David Baltimore, Feb. 2007 - Part 1: Introduction to Viruses: HIV and Non-equilibrium Viruses (34:06)

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In this set of lectures, I describe the threat facing the world from the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and a bold proposal on how we might meet the challenge of eliminating this disease by engineering the immune system. In part 1, I provide a broad introduction to viruses, describing their basic properties and my own history of studying the replication RNA viruses which led to the discovery of reverse transcriptase. I also illustrate the distinguishing features of equilibrium viruses...

Intracellular Parasitism by Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishmania by Norma Andrews, April 2007 - Part 1: Trypanosoma cruzi and Chagas' Disease (19:23)

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Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishmania are closely related intracellular protozoan parasites that cause serious diseases throughout the world. In the first part of this lecture, I will present background material on the biology of Trypanosoma cruzi and the history of its discovery as an important agent of human disease in Latin America. I will also discuss the main characteristics of the disease, and the current efforts to stop human transmission. For more information see:...

Plant Viruses and Crops by Roger Beachy, April 2008 - Part 1: Cell and Molecular Biology of Plant Virus Infection: Early Events and Mechanisms of Pathogenesis

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This seminar describes the cell and molecular biology of plant virus infection. The first lecture will discuss how virus replication centers are set up in plants and how viruses use host cell mechanisms to facilitate cell to cell movement and eventual pathogenesis.

For further information see: http://www.ascb.org/ibioseminars/Beachy/Beachy1.cfm

Apicomplexan Parasites, Pathogen Genome Informatics, and the Evolution of Eukaryotic Organelles by David S. Roos, May 2008 - Part 1: How to build a parasite

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There are more than 5000 species of single-celled eukaryotes in the biological phylum known as the Apicomplexa, including the parasites responsible for malaria, neurological birth defects, and opportunistic infections associated with HIV/AIDS. These ancient protozoa provide a unique window into the evolution of subcellular organelles that have long fascinated cell biologists. Familiar features help to elucidate the origins, functions and design parameters for the secretory pathway,...