The Origin of Vertebrates - Part 1: The Origin of the Vertebrate Nervous System: The Hemichordat

submitted by: video_collector
Modern cell and developmental biology has a lot to contribute to our understanding of the deep history of animal origins, which until recently has been largely the province of paleontology. In this set of lectures, I hope to show how recent studies by a very small group of scientists on a virtually unknown phylum of marine organisms, the hemichordates, has helped explain some of the major mysteries of the origin of vertebrates. This is a tour of not only vertebrate origins but the...

Role of the Neural Crest in Vertebrate Development and Evolution by Nicole Le Douarin, March 2008 - Part 1: The Quail Chick Marker System and Its Use to Study the Ontogeny of the Neural Crest (24:45)

submitted by: video_collector
The neural crest (NC) is a transitory structure of the Vertebrate embryo. It forms when the neural tube closes through the epithelio- mesenchymal transition of the cells in the joining neural folds. Its constitutive cells are endowed of migratory capacities and are highly pluripotent. NC cells migrate in the developing embryo along definite pathways, at precise periods of time during embryogenesis and settle in elected sites in the body where they develop into a large of cell types. The...

Tuberculosis: A Persistent Threat to Global Health - Part 1: Tuberculosis: The Once and Future Plague (27:33)

submitted by: video_collector
Human population growth and urbanization have accelerated dramatically in recent centuries, providing unprecedented opportunities for microbes that use our bodies as vehicles for their own propagation and transmission. These conditions have led to the emergence of virulent new pathogens and the increased prevalence of "classic" scourges, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This tenacious microbe is transmitted via infectious aerosols produced by individuals with pulmonary tuberculosis....

The Dynamic Bacterial Cell: Part 1: Dynamics of Bacterial Chromosome Organization, Segregation, and Cytokinesis (34:32)

submitted by: video_collector
Most bacterial cells have their genes arranged in a single circle of DNA. The circle of DNA plus some attached proteins is referred to as the bacterial chromosome. Up until quite recently, it was thought that the chromosome in the tiny bacteria cell resembled a tangled ball of yarn. It is now known that multiple factors cooperate to condense DNA into a highly dynamic assembly of supercoiled loops. Although there is variability in the lower levels of chromosome structure, the global...

Host-Pathogen Interaction and Human Disease: Part 1: What is a Pathogen? Trying to Understand Human Biology by the Study of Pathogenic Bacteria (37:48)

submitted by: video_collector
Ninety percent of the cells humans carry are microbes. Only a few of the bacteria we encounter are pathogenic and can cause disease. Pathogens possess the inherent ability to cross anatomic barriers or breach other host defenses that limit the microbes that make up our normal flora. A significant part of human evolution has gone into developing ways to thwart microbial intrusion. In turn, microbes have come up with clever ways to avoid and circumvent host defenses but human — microbe...

Malaria presented by Joseph DeRisi, June 2006 - Part 1: Malaria: Background & Overview (21:19)

submitted by: video_collector

This brief set of three lectures gives a very general overview of malaria, the disease and Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of the most deadly form. Basic research as well as drug development efforts will also be covered in parts two and three of this series. For further information see: http://www.ascb.org/ibioseminars/DeRisi/DeRisi1.cfm