Optical Stern-Gerlach with a Ferrofluid Cell

submitted by: SirZerp

Using a camera adjacent to an incandescent lamp with a polarizing filter that is supplying light at a 45 degree incidence angle to the ferrofluid cell. Basically, using a bright lamp instead of a camera flash. If you look, you can see the image of the camera reflected in the background. On the other side of the ferrofluid cell is a single rotating magnet, profile view with a north and south poles adjacent to the cell. Only the magnet moves, everything else is fixed in place.

Magnetic Thinker

submitted by: SirZerp

If the statue was made of Neodymium and magnetized thru the vertical axis, the colors show the energy levels and the white dots show the magnetic 'B' field lines.

Science of the Winter Olympic Games: Olympic Movement and Robotic Design

submitted by: nsf

Professor Raffaello D'Andrea at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich, Switzerland, describes how control systems engineering is laying the groundwork for the design of more "athletic" robots.

Provided by the National Science Foundation & NBC Learn

Science of the Winter Olympic Winter Games: Figure Skating Physics

submitted by: nsf

Figure skating has become one of the most popular events at the Winter Olympics. Head of the Physics Department at the University of Michigan Brad Orr explains that good balance, or stability, is basic to everything a skater does--and that begins with understanding the center of mass.

Provided by the National Science Foundation & NBC Learn

Science of the Winter Olympic Games: Alpine Skiing and Vibration Damping

submitted by: nsf

Kam Leang, a professor at the University of Nevada, Reno, and Tom Watson, of Watson Performance in Hood River, Ore., describe how advanced materials and engineering help reduce unwanted vibration, optimizing the performance of athletes.

Provided by the National Science Foundation & NBC Learn

Science of the Winter Olympic Games: Science of Snow

submitted by: nsf

Snow is an essential part of the 2014 Olympics. How it's formed and how it reacts has been studied by scientists for centuries and continues to this day. Sarah Konrad, a former Winter Olympian who is also a glaciologist at the University of Wyoming, along with Cort Anastasio, a chemistry professor at the University of California, Davis, discuss how humidity and temperature help form snow.

Provided by the National Science Foundation