Tasmanian devils' infectious cancer offer insights into human epidemics

submitted by: nsf

What can we learn about diseases by studying the Tasmanian devils' infectious cancer? Sam Scheiner of the NSF discusses the insight that science can learn by studying these critters.

Visit NSF.gov for more information...
http://www.nsf.gov/discoveries/disc_summ.jsp?cntn_id=129508

Credit: NSF

20131022 - Protein Prediction 2 - Burkhard Rost - Individual Health

submitted by: rostlab

Date: 20131022

Course: Protein Prediction 2

Title: Individual Health

Speaker: Burkhard Rost

Audience: Computer Science students

Researching how musical training affects older adults' speech perception in a noisy environment

submitted by: nsf

Playing a musical instrument can do wonders for our brain. But how does it affect our hearing later on in life? Dr. Nina Kraus of Northwestern University is studying just that.

20131022 - Protein Prediction 2 - Burkhard Rost - Individual Health

submitted by: rostlab

Date: 20131022

Course: Protein Prediction 2

Title: Individual Health

Speaker: Burkhard Rost

Audience: Computational Biology students

Cobalamin supplementation improves motor development and regurgitations in infants: results from a randomized intervention study

Background: During infancy, minor developmental delays and gas- trointestinal complaints are common, as is a biochemical profile in- dicative of impaired cobalamin status. Objective: We investigated whether cobalamin supplementation can improve development or symptoms in infants with biochemical signs of impaired cobalamin function and developmental delay or feeding difficulties. Design: Infants ,8 mo of age (n = 105) who were referred for feeding difficulties, subtle neurologic...
Authors: Anne-Lise Bjørke-Monsen, Trond Markestad, Ingrid Torsvik, Per Magne Ueland

Belief beyond the evidence: using the presumed effect of breakfast on obesity

submitted by: awbrown
Background: Various intentional and unintentional factors in?uence beliefs beyond what scienti?c evidence justi?es. Two such factors are research lacking probative value (RLPV) and biased research reporting (BRR). Objective: We investigated the prevalence of RLPV and BRR in research about the proposition that skipping breakfast causes weight gain, which is called the proposed effect of breakfast on obesity (PEBO) in this article. Design: Studies related to the PEBO were synthesized...
Authors: David Allison, Michelle Bohan Brown, Andrew Brown