SDSU Geological Sciences - Seminar - Kim Bak Olsen

linked profile(s): KimOlsen
submitted by: tcarrasc

LA's Future Earthquake;
Kim Bak Olsen -
Department of Geological Sciences,
San Diego State University

How to Use Portable Steam Collector

submitted by: drscottkelley

This video shows a demonstration of how to use a custom made steam collector designed to condense steam from geothermal vents (aka., fumaroles). This device was used used to collect samples of halophilic Archaea from fumaroles around the world, work which was published in:

Ellis, D., R.W. Bizzoco, and S.T. Kelley. (2008) Halophilic Archaea identified in fumarole steam vapor from vents around the world. Environmental Microbiology, 10: 1582-1590.

SDSU Geological Sciences - Seminar - Eleanora (Norrie) Robbins

submitted by: tcarrasc
Utilization of Geological Techniques to Help Solve an Archaeological Puzzle: When Did People Arrive in North America? Eleanora (Norrie) Robbins Department of Geological Sciences San Diego State University Knut Fladmark hypothesized that as soon as boat technology was developed 40,000 years ago, people probably traveled the oceans. The 40,000-year-ago shoreline is now below 150-160 ft (50 m) of water and an unknown thickness of sediment. So evidence for boat transport by maritime...

Emperors of the Extreme

submitted by: ucsandiego

Emperor penguins can flourish in locales where few other animals roam. But scientists now wonder if they can adapt to a new threat: climate change.

SDSU Geological Sciences - Seminar - Shuo Ma

submitted by: tcarrasc
A Physical Model for Widespread Near-Surface and Fault Zone Damage Induced by Earthquakes - Seismic observations indicate that material velocities at shallow depths decrease over a large area after large earthquakes. The reductions are widespread, and occur at distances of up to several source dimensions. A persistent low-velocity fault zone has also been documented extensively from seismic and geodetic observations, in which the velocity drops further after large earthquakes. Dynamic...

SDSU Geological Sciences - Seminar - Clive Dorman

submitted by: tcarrasc
Tidal Bore on the Severn River - Tides progress up the Severn River in SW England as a tidal bore moving faster than 6 m/s. During spring tides, the leading edge of the bore can be up to 2 m high, taking more than an hour to travel from the lower portion of the river to past Gloucester. This is sufficient to attract surfers from around the world. The North Atlantic amphidromic system interacts with the broad continental shelf around the U.K. to produce a complicated field of large tidal...