SDSU Geological Sciences Webinar - Elizabeth Cochran

submitted by: tcarrasc
Imaging Fault Damage Zones with Seismic and Geodetic Data - Elizabeth Cochran, Department of Earth Sciences, University of California, Riverside: During earthquakes slip is often localized on preexisting faults, but it is not well understood how the structure of crustal faults may contribute to slip localization and energetics. Growing evidence suggests that the crust along active faults suffers anomalous strain and damage during large quakes. Data collected along several faults including...

SDSU Geological Sciences Webinar - Brandon Browne

submitted by: tcarrasc
Not-So-Simple Cinder Cone Plumbing Systems: Examples From the Sierra Nevada - Brandon Browne, Department of Geological Sciences, California State University Fullerton: Cinder cones situated in continental monogenetic volcanic fields are generally thought to erupt single magma batches over short periods of time. However, field mapping efforts combined with petrologic, geochemical, and thermobarometric analysis of erupted products from two unrelated volcanic fields in California (Red Cones, 5...

SDSU Geological Sciences Webinar - David King

submitted by: tcarrasc
The Cretaceous-Paleogene ("KT") Boundary In Belize and Alabama - David T. King, Jr., Department of Geology and Geography, Auburn University, Alabama: Belize - At Albion Island in northern Belize, Cretaceous-Paleogene (KT) boundary deposits, also known as the Albion formation, rest upon karsted and fractured Maastrichtian dolostones. These deposits consist of a basal impactoclastic clay layer (~ 1 to 2-m thick) and an upper carbonate-rich, coarse impactoclastic breccia layer (up to 15-m...

Calit2 Bluff Erosion Project

submitted by: alexmatthews

The cliffs along the San Diego coastline are more than just fodder for picture postcards — a number of residential homes sit perched atop them, and in certain areas, the railroad tracks that serve Amtrak and County Coaster come within several feet of the cliff edge.

A Walk Through Prevo Science Library, DePauw University

submitted by: Caroline Gilson

Take a video tour of the Prevo Science Library.

Getting Started with Ecological Metadata Language - Using Morpho

submitted by: LTER_NetworkOffice_is

You want to create a metadata record that describes your Ecological Data set. You want this metadata document to be standardized for easy sharing - and you thought that you would use the Ecological Metadata Language (EML). One way to create EML records is using Morpho. Morphos is free, download it from the "ecoinformatics.org" site and use this video-tutorial to see how you can use Morpho.