Jellyfish swarms research in the Gulf of Mexico

submitted by: nsf

Jellyfish swarms in the Gulf of Mexico help researchers identify environmental changes in the water. Dr. Monty Graham at the University of Southern Mississippi studies these massive jellyfish swarms that can stretch for up to 100 miles.

NCAR study points to increase in unhealthy summertime ozone levels

submitted by: nsf

Local weather forecast warnings about unhealthy air could become much more common around the country. A recent scientific study by the National Center for Atmospheric Research warns of a whopping 70% increase in the number of days with unhealthy summertime ozone levels by the year 2050.

How tiger sharks affect Shark Bay’s ecosystem

submitted by: nsf

For the last two decades, Michael Heithaus has been studying how tiger sharks affect one particular ecosystem – Shark Bay, Australia, one of the world’s most pristine seagrass ecosystems. The Florida International University biologist explains how his team studies these top predators and their prey, and why tiger sharks are so important to the health of Shark Bay.

Saving our ecologically important coral reefs

submitted by: nsf
Coral reefs are dying. Harboring some of the most diverse species of marine life, corals are ecologically important. Paul Sikkel, a marine ecologist from Arkansas State University, explains why many coral reefs are dying and how we can save them. For more information, visit: http://www.nsf.gov/discoveries/disc_summ.jsp?cntn_id=129643 http://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=124768 http://www.livescience.com/40687-gnathia-marleyi-controversy-nsf-ria.htm...

HERESY AND MEDICINE IN THE MIDDLE AGES

submitted by: camdic

"I fought a lot; I thought I could win, but fate and nature repressed my study and my efforts. But it is already something to be on the battlefield, because to win depends very much on fortune. But I did as much as I could, and I do not think anyone, of the future generation, will deny it. I was not afraid of death, I never gave in to anyone, I chose courageous death instead of a coward’s life". Giordano Bruno, De Monade (1591).

The Great Pacific Garbage Patch explained

submitted by: nsf
In light of the sheer physical enormity of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch and the complexity of its causes, what can we possibility do about it? Perhaps help protect some vulnerable populations of wildlife from marine garbage in coastal regions, according to the Coastal Observation and Seabird Survey Team (COASST) — a citizen science group that monitors marine resources and ecosystem health at more than 350 beaches from northern California to Alaska. Although COASST, which receives...