Rising Tide

It’s not the extra few feet of water that make sea level rise so dangerous. It’s the extra few feet during a storm during El Niño during high tide, say researchers.

BILD 1: Scientific FUNding

submitted by: joshuadarnell

BILD 1 Fall 2008
Rhianon Anderson
Joshua Darnell
Elmar Malek
Ned Premyodhin
Jenna Rosenblatt
Antonio Venegas

TA: Sarah, W 7pm.

Underwater Scientist

submitted by: HelenaCzerski
Have you ever wondered what it's like to be an ocean scientist? In this video Dr Helen Czerski talks about why she's so enthusiastic about ocean science, and what the job entails. Helen is one of the UK NOISEmakers, a group of scientists who regularly talk about their jobs and encourage young people to consider science as a career. For more information about the NOISE campain, look at http://www.noisemakers.org.uk/

Antibiotics: Is a Strong Offense the Best Defense? (Part 3 of 3) MWV23

submitted by: MicrobeWorld
In the final episode of this 3 part video series on how to optimize antibiotic use and minimize the emergence of drug resistant pathogens, Dr. Linda Tollefson, Assistant Commissioner for Science at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, goes in depth on the use of antimicrobial drugs in agriculture, their efficacy, and adverse human health consequences. Dr. Stuart Levy, professor of Molecular Biology and Microbiology at Tufts University School of Medicine, discusses policy, regulatory and...

SDSU Geological Sciences - Seminar - John A. Izbicki

submitted by: tcarrasc
Sources of Fecal Indicator Bacteria in Urban Streams and Ocean Beaches, Santa Barbara, California; Fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) concentrations in urban streams and ocean beaches in Santa Barbara, Calif. can exceed water-quality standards for recreational water. During low flow, high FIB concentrations in urban streams were associated with point discharges from storm drains, and concentrations in urban streamflow varied three-fold over the course of a day as a result of small variations in...

Our First Sip of Seawater

submitted by: ucsandiego

There's one way Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego researchers see the future of desalination in California going. Before a regulatory structure can take shape to govern how seawater is treated and transported to a thirsty public, a gubernatorial order will be handed down that fast-tracks the construction of desalination plants during an episode of extreme drought when battles over water turn violent. Ecological casualties would be assured.