Expansion microscopy brings the brain in 3-D into focus

submitted by: nsf
While most efforts to understand the brain focus on new technologies to magnify small anatomical features, engineers at the MIT-based Center for Brains, Minds and Machines have found a way to make brains physically bigger. The technique, which the researchers call expansion microscopy, uses an expandable polymer and water to swell brain tissue to about four and a half times its usual size, so that nanoscale structures once blurry appear sharp with an ordinary confocal microscope. Expansion...

New, smaller PMIC chip - CES 2015

submitted by: nsf
A significant amount of real estate inside your cell phone is taken up by a chip called a power management integrated circuit (PMIC). The chip delivers power from the battery to different areas within the phone, an efficient but bulky system. Now, NSF-funded small business Lion Semiconductor has designed a chip that is two to three times smaller than existing ones. A smaller chip means more room for a bigger battery – and longer battery life – or a thinner, smaller device. Wonyoung...

Empire Robotics demos soft gripper on ping pong balls - CES 2015

submitted by: nsf

At the 2015 Consumer Electronics Show, Empire Robotics displayed their innovative soft gripper technology by outcompeting human challengers with their precision ping pong tossing.

Empire Robotics plans to use this technology for industrial applications.

Froment Engine

submitted by: SirZerp

Showing the potential energy levels around the magnets of a Forment Engine, one of the first electric motors in production.

Organs on a chip

submitted by: nsf

Organs on a chip systems could transform the medical drug pipeline as we know it. Biomedical engineer Ali Khademhosseini explains how he and his team at MIT are engineering tissues outside of the human body and connecting different "organs" to solve some pressing challenges.

Engineering a Smart Bandaid

submitted by: nsf

What does it take to engineer a smart bandaid? Biomedical engineer Ali Khademhosseini walks us through the future of bandaids, and how he and his team at MIT are testing them.