New, smaller PMIC chip - CES 2015

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A significant amount of real estate inside your cell phone is taken up by a chip called a power management integrated circuit (PMIC). The chip delivers power from the battery to different areas within the phone, an efficient but bulky system. Now, NSF-funded small business Lion Semiconductor has designed a chip that is two to three times smaller than existing ones. A smaller chip means more room for a bigger battery – and longer battery life – or a thinner, smaller device. Wonyoung...

Empire Robotics demos soft gripper on ping pong balls - CES 2015

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At the 2015 Consumer Electronics Show, Empire Robotics displayed their innovative soft gripper technology by outcompeting human challengers with their precision ping pong tossing.

Empire Robotics plans to use this technology for industrial applications.

Organs on a chip

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Organs on a chip systems could transform the medical drug pipeline as we know it. Biomedical engineer Ali Khademhosseini explains how he and his team at MIT are engineering tissues outside of the human body and connecting different "organs" to solve some pressing challenges.

Engineering a Smart Bandaid

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What does it take to engineer a smart bandaid? Biomedical engineer Ali Khademhosseini walks us through the future of bandaids, and how he and his team at MIT are testing them.

Helping health care technologies communicate

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Julian Goldman, a physician at Mass General Hospital, knows better than most the frustrations that doctors face when they're confronted with computer systems and devices that just won't communicate with each other. His lab has been a pioneer in developing open source tools and standards designed to integrate the various technologies used in homes and hospitals. The effort, in turn, led to the development of a community of likeminded researchers and manufacturers that would like to break...

Local 3D printing hubs bring manufacturing back to U.S.

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Imaginestics is a start-up out of West Lafayette, Indiana, founded by Nainesh Rathod. At the Smart America Expo, Rathod was part of a team that demonstrated the potential impact of "Smart Shape Technology" on 3D printing and local manufacturing hubs. The system lets you can take a picture of a part of a larger device with a mobile phone, and then identify a local retailer where this part can be found or instantly print it at a local neighborhood 3D printing service provider. The...