The High Performance Wireless Research and Education Network (HPWREN)

submitted by: Hans

The High Performance Wireless Research and Education Network (HPWREN) is a National Science Foundation funded network research project, which also functions as a collaborative interdisciplinary and multi-institutional cyberinfrastructure for research, education, and first responder activities. The program includes the creation, demonstration, and evaluation of a non-commercial, prototype, high-performance, wide-area, wireless network in San Diego, Riverside, and Imperial counties.

Keepers of the Flam

submitted by: DakinHenderson

This is a portrait of an ecological study on Flammulated Owls, being conducted in Colorado by Brian Linkhart. The film investigates all aspects of the study: the science, the people, the setting, and the birds themselves. This version is condensed to 15 minutes from the original length of 38 minutes. For the full-length version please contact dakinhenderson@gmail.com.

Saving the Tijuana Estuary

submitted by: ucsandiego

The estuary stands as the last barrier between the Pacific Ocean and pollution. Its mix of plants and silt acts as a filter that purifies inland rain and flood waters before they reach the ocean. The beaches of Imperial Beach are closed about 180 days every year. Without the estuary, they would be closed year round.

Big City, Little Prairies

submitted by: partspermillion
Are you a member of the ESA Student Section? To vote for this film (film #3) as Student's Choice in the 2008 Student Ecofilm Awards ( http://www.esa.org/students/section/?q=node/51 ) please send your email vote as formatted below: To: salguero@sas.upenn.edu Subject: ESA Student Section SEAs Choice Award vote Body: Vote #3 If you are not yet a member of the student section, you can join easily! Click on the following link and follow the instructions (...

The Beach of the Future

Building upon a legacy of coastal science at Scripps, high-tech tools are opening new avenues for researchers to track sand movements and further explain beach systems.

Spiranthes praecox Rich.

submitted by: Timothy M. Jones
Spiranthes praecox, greenvein lady's tresses, is an orchid native to eastern North America, from eastern Texas to New Jersey. Though many members of the genus are difficult to identify, this species is readily distinguished by the green veins on the lip of the flower. A yellow veined form is also known (C.J. Sheviak and P.M. Brown. In: Flora of North America. Vol 26, 2002). Plant 15-80 cm tall; with mostly linear leaves (1 - 5 mm wide) often hidden in leaf litter; inflorescence...