SDSU Geological Sciences Webinar - Shawn Wright

submitted by: tcarrasc
TIR spectroscopy of shocked Deccan basalt: Implications for Mars and Martian meteorites: Shawn Wright, Institute of Meteoritics, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, University of New Mexico - Hundreds of thousands of impact craters dominate the surfaces of the Moon, Mercury, and Mars. There exists much geomorphic and spectral evidence for basalt on those surfaces, so basaltic target rocks are most likely common. However, little work has been done on the thermal infrared (TIR)...

Brain Makeover

submitted by: Science Cheerleader
The Science Cheerleader, Physics Professor James Trefil of George Mason University, and the Philadelphia 76ers want you to give it up for the key concepts in science that will help you be a “scientific literate,” pain-free! (Pssst: Only 7% of the adult American population are science literate*, and that includes all the scientists and engineers. (*Why Science?, Teachers College Press, 11/1/97.) To start your Brain Makeover, click on any one of Trefil's 18 Big Ideas to watch a 76er...

SDSU Geological Sciences Webinar - David King

submitted by: tcarrasc
The Cretaceous-Paleogene ("KT") Boundary In Belize and Alabama - David T. King, Jr., Department of Geology and Geography, Auburn University, Alabama: Belize - At Albion Island in northern Belize, Cretaceous-Paleogene (KT) boundary deposits, also known as the Albion formation, rest upon karsted and fractured Maastrichtian dolostones. These deposits consist of a basal impactoclastic clay layer (~ 1 to 2-m thick) and an upper carbonate-rich, coarse impactoclastic breccia layer (up to 15-m...

Calit2 Bluff Erosion Project

submitted by: alexmatthews

The cliffs along the San Diego coastline are more than just fodder for picture postcards — a number of residential homes sit perched atop them, and in certain areas, the railroad tracks that serve Amtrak and County Coaster come within several feet of the cliff edge.

Getting Started with Ecological Metadata Language - Using Morpho

submitted by: LTER_NetworkOffice_is

You want to create a metadata record that describes your Ecological Data set. You want this metadata document to be standardized for easy sharing - and you thought that you would use the Ecological Metadata Language (EML). One way to create EML records is using Morpho. Morphos is free, download it from the "" site and use this video-tutorial to see how you can use Morpho.

Plant biotech for food and environment

submitted by: pieter

A better knowledge ot the processes in plants can lead to plants that are better suited for food and environment.