ES4FUN 2.2 - Feedback and structural symmetries

submitted by: es4fun
ES4FUN is a Physics-driven educational project with the aim of spreading universal scientific concepts in a game context, with research high-tech and audio+video clip support Interactive video games have been implemented with LabVIEW to highlight the concepts feedback and structural symmetries. The clip has been made with the graphic material recorded during the III Workshop on Teaching Innovation in Chemistry (University of Cadiz, 23-25 June 2008), in collaboration with the UCADanza...

It’s easy to get lost on the biological superhighway. Thankfully, we brought a map.

submitted by: dabraham
Biological annotations and terms have gotten a makeover with RGD’s interactive pathway diagrams. The Rat Genome Database makes biological pathways and their components easy to navigate and analyze through this newly added diagrams feature at http://rgd.mcw.edu/wg/pathway?100 . This video will show you how to easily access, view, and gather information from these diagrams and all the great tools they offer. See our RGD website at http://rgd.mcw.edu for more information and tools for...

Some prefer blue jeans...RGD prefers disease genes

submitted by: dabraham
Who knew you could find disease genes without even stepping into the laboratory? This video provides a tutorial on how to utilize the Disease Portals on the Rat Genome Database website at http://rgd.mcw.edu/wg/portals . These portals allow you to search for disease, phenotype, biological process, and pathway specific rat, mouse, and human genes and data. See our RGD website at http://rgd.mcw.edu for more information and tools for researchers...

The Real Lab: Orthopaedic Mechanobiology

submitted by: eternes

University of Maryland students take a fun look into the "real lab" life of three biomechanical engineering undergraduates who research how engineering and biology can help our health.

Heading Due South

Scripps researchers gather geomagnetic signs to determine if Earth's magnetic field is currently headed toward a complete reversal

Research in the Autonomous Vehicle Lab, University of Maryland

submitted by: eternes

How flying robots imitate insects, explained by University of Maryland aerospace engineering graduate students Joe Conroy and Andrew Hyslop. Winning science video in 2008 Vid/Terp competition. http://www.newsdesk.umd.edu/undergradexp/release.cfm?ArticleID=1647