Jellyfish swarms research in the Gulf of Mexico

submitted by: nsf

Jellyfish swarms in the Gulf of Mexico help researchers identify environmental changes in the water. Dr. Monty Graham at the University of Southern Mississippi studies these massive jellyfish swarms that can stretch for up to 100 miles.

biosights: September 1, 2014 - Deploying exosomes in a battle of the sexes

submitted by: JCB
The paired accessory glands of male Drosophila secrete multiple signaling factors into the seminal fluid that promote reproductive success by altering the recipient female's physiology and behavior. Corrigan et al. reveal that the secondary cells of accessory glands secrete membrane-bound exosomes in a BMP-dependent manner that, after being transferred into the female reproductive tract, inhibit the female's inclination to re-mate with other male flies. This biosights episode presents the...

Evaluación de Aptitud Reproductiva del Toro

Parte I de una serie de videos referentes a la Evaluación de Aptitud Reproductiva del Toro.
Se describe el tema desde un punto de vista práctico.
Material útil para profesionales y estudiantes.

Butterfly proboscis and galeal sliding

submitted by: nsf
Enjoy this research video of a butterfly's proboscis and its galeae sliding against one another. For more information visit: http://newsstand.clemson.edu/mediarelations/butterflies-could-hold-key-t... http://www.clemson.edu/ces/kornevlab http://www.clemson.edu/cafls/departments/biosci/faculty_staff/adler_p.ht... http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=1354956&HistoricalAwards...

How tiger sharks affect Shark Bay’s ecosystem

submitted by: nsf

For the last two decades, Michael Heithaus has been studying how tiger sharks affect one particular ecosystem – Shark Bay, Australia, one of the world’s most pristine seagrass ecosystems. The Florida International University biologist explains how his team studies these top predators and their prey, and why tiger sharks are so important to the health of Shark Bay.

MyD88 knockout mice develop initial enlarged periapical

AIM: To characterize the formation and progression of experimentally induced periapical lesions in teeth of MyD88 knockout (MyD88 KO) mice compared with wild-type (WT) mice. METHODOLOGY: Periapical lesions were induced in the mandibular first molars of 30 WT and 30 MyD88 KO mice. After 7, 21 and 42 days, the animals were euthanized and the mandibles were subjected to histotechnical processing. Histological sections were stained with haematoxylin and eosin (HE), TRAP histoenzymology,...
Authors: Raquel Assed Bezerra da Silva, Paulo Nelson-Filho, Marília Pacífico Lucisano, Andiara De Rossi, Alexandra Mussolino de Queiroz, Lea Assed Bezerra da Silva