biosights: September 29, 2014 - Cdc42 prompts a change of heart

submitted by: JCB
The Drosophila heart is a simple tubular structure with a central lumen. Vogler et al. reveal that the small GTPase Cdc42 and actin-nucleating formin proteins promote lumen formation by regulating the dynamics of non-muscle myosin in cardioblasts during heart morphogenesis. This biosights episode presents the paper by Vogler et al. from the September 29, 2014, issue of The Journal of Cell Biology and includes an interview with two of the paper's authors, Georg Vogler and Rolf Bodmer...

Jellyfish swarms research in the Gulf of Mexico

submitted by: nsf

Jellyfish swarms in the Gulf of Mexico help researchers identify environmental changes in the water. Dr. Monty Graham at the University of Southern Mississippi studies these massive jellyfish swarms that can stretch for up to 100 miles.

biosights: September 1, 2014 - Deploying exosomes in a battle of the sexes

submitted by: JCB
The paired accessory glands of male Drosophila secrete multiple signaling factors into the seminal fluid that promote reproductive success by altering the recipient female's physiology and behavior. Corrigan et al. reveal that the secondary cells of accessory glands secrete membrane-bound exosomes in a BMP-dependent manner that, after being transferred into the female reproductive tract, inhibit the female's inclination to re-mate with other male flies. This biosights episode presents the...

Evaluación de Aptitud Reproductiva del Toro

Parte I de una serie de videos referentes a la Evaluación de Aptitud Reproductiva del Toro.
Se describe el tema desde un punto de vista práctico.
Material útil para profesionales y estudiantes.

Butterfly proboscis and galeal sliding

submitted by: nsf
Enjoy this research video of a butterfly's proboscis and its galeae sliding against one another. For more information visit: http://newsstand.clemson.edu/mediarelations/butterflies-could-hold-key-t... http://www.clemson.edu/ces/kornevlab http://www.clemson.edu/cafls/departments/biosci/faculty_staff/adler_p.ht... http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=1354956&HistoricalAwards...

How tiger sharks affect Shark Bay’s ecosystem

submitted by: nsf

For the last two decades, Michael Heithaus has been studying how tiger sharks affect one particular ecosystem – Shark Bay, Australia, one of the world’s most pristine seagrass ecosystems. The Florida International University biologist explains how his team studies these top predators and their prey, and why tiger sharks are so important to the health of Shark Bay.