Active Smectics

submitted by: icamvid

Active Smectics by Dr. Sriram Ramaswamy, TIFR Centre for Interdisciplinary Sciences

Safety of Conventional and Biotech Food: How Safe is Safe?

submitted by: UP Los Baños

Documentation of the special seminar on Safety of Conventional and Biotech Food: How Safe is Safe? by Dr. Antonio C. Laurena
Research Professor, Crop Science Cluster-Institute of Plant Breeding, University of the Philippines Los Banos on June 20, 2013.

Diet, microbiota, and microbial metabolites in colon cancer risk in rural Africans and African Americans

submitted by: sjokeefe
Background: Epidemiologic studies have suggested that most cases of sporadic colon cancer can be attributed to diet. The recognition that colonic microbiota have a major influence on colonic health suggests that they might mediate colonic carcinogenesis. Objective: To examine the hypothesis that the influence of diet on colon cancer risk is mediated by the microbiota through their metabolites, we measured differences in colonic microbes and their metabolites in African Americans with a...
Authors: Junhai Ou, Franck Carbonero, Erwin G Zoetendal, James P DeLany, Mei Wang, Keith Newton, H Rex Gaskins, Stephen JD O’Keefe

MWV Episode 72 - Jonathan Eisen - Evolvability, the Built Environment and Open Science

submitted by: MicrobeWorld
Jonathan Eisen is an evolutionary biologist, currently working at University of California, Davis and is the academic editor-in-chief of the open-access journal PLoS Biology. On this episode, Jonathan talks about "evolvability," the probability that organisms can invent new functions. To do this, he has been using genome data in conjunction with experimental information to try and understand the mechanisms by which new functions have originated. Another area of interest for Eisen is the...

Why Choose Skaggs?

submitted by: Sarah Ross

Final for Bioinformatics.

A Whole-Grain–Rich Diet Reduces Urinary Excretion of Markers of Protein Catabolism and Gut Microbiota Metabolism in Healthy Men after One Week

submitted by: Alastair Ross
Epidemiological studies consistently find that diets rich in whole-grain (WG) cereals lead to decreased risk of disease compared with refined grain (RG)-based diets. Aside from a greater amount of fiber and micronutrients, possible mechanisms for why WGs may be beneficial for health remain speculative. In an exploratory, randomized, researcherblinded, crossover trial, we measured metabolic profile differences between healthy participants eating a diet based on WGs compared with a diet...
Authors: Alastair Ross, Emma Pere-Trépat, Ivan Montoliu, Francois-Pierre Martin, Sebastiano Collino, Sofia Moco, Jean-Philippe Godin, Marilyn Cléroux, Philippe Guy, Isabelle Breton, Rodrigo Bibiloni, Anita Thorimbert, Isabelle Tavazzi, Lionel Tornier, Aude Bebuis, Stephen Bruce, Maurice Beaumont, Laurent-Bernard Fay, Sunil Kochhar