Resonance: Radio, Wineglasses, Opera Singers and Cycles

submitted by: RayTomes
Resonance is the quality of transmitting even tiny signals between systems that are tuned to the same frequency. Given that cycles of common period are found pervading many different disciplines, perhaps an explanation may be found in resonance. An example is the 160 minute (and associated 80 minute cycle) cycle, found in biological systems, outer planetary spacings, the rotation rates of planets, asteroids and binary stars, solar oscillation and flux and galactic cores. A cosmic pervading...

Lisa Schulte, Iowa State University Landscape Ecologist

submitted by: edtech-isu

Research News from Iowa State University's College of Agriculture and Life Sciences
Lisa Schulte, Iowa State University Landscape Ecologist, discusses her latest publication Homogenization of northern U.S. Great Lakes forests due to land use

Serious Sediment - Partners Video Magazine

submitted by: csrees
Rutgers' Donna Fennell is reclaiming chlorine-contaminated sediments in New Jersey 's urban Meadowlands through smart environmental engineering and microbiological enrichment. Serious Sediment is a segment from CSREES' Partners Video Magazine's 19th episode, The Soil Explorers. To view the entire episode, go to http://www.csrees.usda.gov/newsroom/partners/soil_explorers.html .

Harmonic Cloud Patterns on Jupiter

submitted by: RayTomes

Regularly spaced clouds appear in Jupiter's belts, sometimes white spots and sometimes swirling waves. A polar projection of Jupiter, made by NASA from the 2000 flyby, allows accurate testing of the hypothesis that these waves form as predicted by the Harmonics Theory. It is found that expected strong harmonics 12, 24 and 72 are present.

MSI-CIEC: Linked Environments for Atmospheric Discovery (LEAD)

submitted by: foxsdengcf

Jay Alameda discusses "Linked Environments for Atmospheric Discovery (LEAD)" at the Minority-Serving Institutions Cyberinfrastructure Institute (MSICI2) Planning and Learning Meeting held at SDSC January 30-31 2006

The Keeling Curve Turns 50

The inception of the "Keeling Curve," a history of atmospheric carbon dioxide levels, marked a key moment in American science history. The record began in March, 1958 at a small observatory on the top of Hawaii's Mauna Loa.